Becky Comments About Kimmer Advising Very Low Calorie Intake

2 10 2007

In our comments, Becky (former admin Littlebit) commented about Kimmer’s private emails to her regarding very low calorie intake.

Kimmer (Heidi Diaz) wrote:

Someone can “eat clean” and still be too high in calories, even if they’re low by other diet standards.

Certainly no one would think 900 calories a day is “high”, but it’s 3 times as much as someone doing the Egg White Challenge at 300 calories a day. Weight loss will be different. Don’t forget people who dabble in days of fasting, too.

If someone wants to lose “as quickly” as someone else, maybe it behooves us to see how they did it. Was their weight loss accomplished by methods we would want to follow? Many people on this site have a problem with very low calories and refuse.

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Becky Continues in Part 3 (Repost)

1 10 2007




Becky Continues

27 09 2007

Just moments ago, Becky posted a continuation of Kimkins: The Perfect Storm.

Now, a look at the professional practices of Kimkins.

Kimmer first gave out her brand of diet advice (as well as hair care and skin care tips) for years on Low Carb Friends, which garnered both followers and foes. I am not sure when the idea of her own site first began in her mind, whether it was all a carefully-laid plan, or just an opportunity too good to pass up when it arose. Judging from her track record of not sticking very long with any one thing (whether it be school or work or a relationship), I would guess that it was the latter. My conjecture is that she joined the diet site in all sincerity, hoping to lose weight like anyone else. She probably learned some things and had some initial success, but then, being Kimmer, she just couldn’t help embellishing things a bit, highlighting her successes and ignoring her failings, amplifying it more and more, becoming more extreme over time, as it began to attract some attention. Gradually, the gap between her words and her actions widened, as she could not follow through with her knowledge and intentions, but could not allow herself to back down and admit it, either.

She may have done what many of us have done —- promised herself to get back on track tomorrow, next week, next month, try to be extra strict to make up for it, only to give in to her old ways again. Her real life wasn’t working for her at all — but online she could be the best possible version of herself, everything she every dreamed of, until perhaps she came to believe it herself. The attention and approbation were too addicting.

At some point, it seems, delusion reigned supreme, and there was no backing down. As her claims became more grandiose and her polarizing presence began to dominate and draw heat more and more at the LCF forum, another member, Catherine, approached her with the idea of an ebook and a website to sell it. (Read more here.) I think it was the brass ring, the golden goose, and Kimmer/Heidi grabbed at the opportunity for . Once that thought was there, I do believe Kimmer purposely aggravated her enemies and gathered her fans even more, setting the stage for her big exit. Soon, ‘Kimmer’ flounced off in a huff, and Kimkins.com was launched as a partnership between Heidi Diaz, supposed diet guru and Catherine McDonald, tech expert.

In the early days of the Kimkins website, Kimmer seemed to have it all — a successful diet plan, satisfied customers who were easy to please, low overhead, and a competent business partner who made her ideas work. Her departure from LCF calmed down hostilities quite a bit all around, and Kimmer was left to operate her own site in her own little corner of the internet with little interference. If she had made the right moves then, Heidi/Kimmer might possibly have been able to continue on course to a legitimate business success for quite some time to come. However, because Kimmer at her core is a fraud, it was inevitable that any enterprise built on that basis would soon begin to crumble.

Kimmer was not only a fraud in her own personal claims of large, rapid weight loss, but she soon began building the business of Kimkins around fraud at virtually every level — member service, marketing, and management.

~ Fraudulent Member Service: She lied to her members about the safety and efficacy of her diet plans, leading them to believe her plans were safely based on the recognized plans of doctors such as Dr. Atkins and Dr. Stillman, while continuing to push them ever farther away from the cautions and sensible limits of those plans. She assured members it was safe, because, after all, it had worked so well for her, or so she said. She also began to be less and less available to members, despite her promised member benefit of ‘personal coaching‘. She ignored or gave inadequate and misleading answers to valid member concerns. This was because she apparently preferred to spend her energies on marketing, to keep new paying customers coming in the front door while leaving the members mostly on their own to look out for one another.

~ Fraudulent Marketing: In her marketing campaign, she lied to prospective members by spamming Craigslist with fake listings to plug Kimkins, by posting phony ‘articles’ and answers and numerous blogs for Kimkins all over the internet under various names, by promoting Kimkins with false implied celebrity endorsements specifically to target teens, and primarily by posting numerous fraudulent ’success’ stories with ‘lifted’ and photoshopped ‘before’ and ‘after’ pictures. She also made numerous claims she had no proof of or right to make, in violation of FTC regulations.

~ Fraudulent Management: Heidi/Kimmer entered into partnership with Catherine originally under false pretenses, and continued to lie to her about many things, including the source of the ‘success stories‘. It also appears that Heidi skimmed a certain part of the gross proceeds from the partnership before profits were split, by funneling income to supposed affiliate accounts which actually led back to her. It is unclear whether proper legal or tax filings were ever made, though it does not appear they were.

In matters big and small, every bit of the Kimkins enterprise was fraught with deception. It was bound to catch up to her sooner or later.

Before too long, Catherine began to have concerns about Heidi’s integrity, and backed out of the partnership. At this point, Kimmer claims to have brought in 4 other partners to finance Catherine’s buyout, but this is highly doubtful. For one thing, one of the partners she claims to have brought in at that time is Heidi Diaz, but photographic and written evidence clearly shows that Kimmer herself is Heidi Diaz. (For example, Kimmer has always acknowledged that Catherine was her partner in the beginning, and Catherine signed the original partnership agreement with Heidi Diaz.) Other names mentioned as possible ‘partners’ include Dennis Sharp (her son), Vanessa Sharp and/or Romero (Vanessa Romero is her niece), Nicki or Nikki Sharp, and Tish Diaz. It is extremely unlikely that these relatives are actually working, decision-making partners as Kimmer leads people to believe. It is possible they put up some money so Heidi could buy out Catherine; it is possible she got money from them under some other pretext; it is very possible they know little or nothing, and she is just using their names to seem like a larger and more legitimate enterprise. Nicki and later Vanessa disappeared from the “Meet Your Team’ roster some time ago, so it is possible they were based on actual people who became aware of the use of their identities, and protested it.

I have seen various things supposedly ‘written’ by some of those names and now Brad Johnson. To me. they all have the same unmistakable writing style, and are all almost surely written by Heidi herself, who freely admits to writing frequently under various male and female names. No one has ever spoken or communicated with any of them, except through Kimmer, and she trotted out the same excuses over and over as to why they were not available. (Usually they were ‘called out of town to deal with a sick father’.) Kimmer herself often spoke to me of doing all affiliate payouts and answering affiliate questions, even though she supposedly had an affiliate manager. These ‘partners’ were probably a construct that Kimmer used to pass blame, as when criticizing someone (’the partners don’t think they are getting their money’s worth’) or floating unpopular ideas (’the partners are pressing to make the fees monthly vs. lifetime membership’, which she brought up to me several times), as well as to provide other ‘identities’ under which to hide income.

In fact, there is no good reason to assume that the entity of Kimkins is anything other than Heidi Diaz sitting at her computer pumping out fraudulent marketing and picking up funds from Paypal and the mailbox, with a tech guy or two working remotely and unaware of the real situation, and paid and unpaid admins and members doing the heavy lifting on the site.

The best of businesses, with a solid business plan and an experienced team of managers would have been hard pressed to absorb the massive explosion of growth that occurred with the Woman’s World magazine feature. Kimmer only had forum helpers with very little knowledge of the true nature of the business; after all, she could not afford to bring anyone into her confidence, because she had too many secrets to hide. So, Heidi was suddenly way out of her league. She was gleeful at the funds rolling in, and foolishly thought she could continue to get away with the same type of scamming indefinitely. She was even in contact with Star magazine for another feature. Who knows? Maybe she even thought she could lose the weight, go legit, and make it work. However, her newfound success soon began to cave in on her.

Once thousands of new members hit the site and began trying to understand and apply the diet, the pressure was too heavy and all the cracks in the foundation soon began to appear. Without the personal mentoring and reinterpretation of the diets that new members had received before, the flaws and gaps in Heidi’s business soon became very evident. Many of those coming in with fresh eyes clearly saw the disparity between what was promised and what was delivered. Many clearly saw the dangers of the diet plans, all of them. Of the 40,000 or more who joined, most never even tried the diet once they actually saw it, and many who did try it did not stick with it long. Meanwhile, all the massive attention the diet was receiving reignited the souldering controversy that she thought she had left behind at LCF. However, Heidi did have two things working in her favor: the misplaced support of people like me who encouraged new members to stick with it, and the absolute sheer desperation of overweight people who had almost given up hope. For my own blindness and supporting role in it, I am sick-to-my-stomach sorry, and beg forgiveness.

At this time, Heidi seemed manic with delight over the income rolling in, and eager to spin off new ventures – more magazine and media features, merchandise, and related enterprises like the nutrition business she offered me. She could hardly be bothered with member support or complaints, and brushed off all concerns as something irrelevant, hardly worthy of her attention, even as worrisome side effects and evidences of her dishonesty mounted. Thus, the round of emails I pressed on her, with the results that we admins began to leave and express our concerns and experiences.

Our exits and warnings further precipitated a rash of blockings and bannings, as other members took up the banner and began speaking out. The business of Kimkins is now woefully in breech of the terms of their agreement with their members, who paid for lifetime membership in a healthy and safe diet followed by a woman who lost 198 lbs in 11 months and maintained it, only to be booted without warning when they complained that the diet was unsafe and the owner’s story was a lie. Members have had ‘privileges’ like private messaging and blog links in their signatures revoked, have been flamed and harangued mercilessly for any hint of breaking ranks,and have been banned without warning, redress, or refund on the vaguest pretext of ‘violation of Terms of Service’, which, like the diet plans and disclaimers, are an ever-moving target, conveniently changed after the fact.

Kimmer had it all — a million dollar website, a great staff, great member loyalty, and great future prospects. And due to great greed, arrogance, and dishonesty she threw it away.

Kimmer is now behaving like a rat backed into a corner, biting and snarling, while looking for a way of to escape unscathed. She is starting to meltdown, trying to cover her tracks and salvage what she can, leaving more of the running of things in the hands of unqualified admins. Perhaps she still thinks she can pull it off, or perhaps she is making her exit plans. As she continues to overestimate herself and underestimate her opponents, she will find, once again, that she has made a grave mistake in waiting too long.

Kimmer is a dangerous fraud, and the business of Kimkins is a dangerous fraud.

Both need to be stopped, and the sooner, the better.

14 comments

Comments feed for this article

September 27, 2007 at 7:47 pm

Becky Continues by diet.MEDtrials.info

[…] continues at Just Ducky brought to you by diet.medtrials.info and […]

September 27, 2007 at 7:50 pm

Mimi

A note about the timeline … correct me if I’m wrong, but from all the digging that’s been done, Kimkins.com was set up BEFORE Heidi left LCF.

She had found LCF fertile ground for cultivating a crop of victims, but couldn’t harvest them until (according to the CreditBoard) her bankruptcy and other liens had “timed off.”

In the meantime, she was getting the website ready. When the time-off date had passed, that’s when she left LCF and started charging money for memberships.

This is, to the best of my knowledge, the REAL timeline.

September 27, 2007 at 8:01 pm

Celebrity » Becky Continues

[…] admin wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerptKimmer first gave out her brand of diet advice (as well as hair care and skin care tips) for years on Low Carb Friends, which garnered both followers and foes. I am not sure when the idea of her own site first began in her mind, … […]

September 27, 2007 at 8:10 pm

Becky/Littlebit

I believe that Kimkins.com as a domain name was registered in April. 2006, the big flail-up happened in late May or early June, with site launch very shortly after.

Catherine or Martin would know more.

September 27, 2007 at 8:21 pm

Mimi

Yes I’m confusing registration of the domain, with opening the board. What I mean is, basically, she was laying the groundwork for the board, preparing, and building up to her dramatic exit from LCF.

As one of the other commenters has stated elsewhere, Heidi isn’t mentally ill — she’s simply evil, and she knows exactly what she’s doing. She’s fully aware of her intentions and her actions, fully capable of outcome-based behaviors.

September 27, 2007 at 9:54 pm

Tam (Kimkins refugee)

Becky (assuming you come back to this blog), after the WW article, was it ever *confirmed* that over 35,000 new members actually paid the life-time membership fee? Confirmed by anyone other than Kimmer, I should say. Did you have access to those types of figures, names and numbers?

I was a member there at the time and, yes, it was mind-boggling with the flood of new members, but close to 40,000? I’ve always had trouble believing that figure. If that’s really the case, the vast majority of them obviously didn’t stick around to post in the forums.

Don’t get me wrong. I don’t doubt YOU, Becky. But I can see how Kimmer would exaggerate the numbers just, as you said, “to seem like a larger and more legitimate enterprise.”

If the 40,000 figure is anywhere close to accurate … where are all these people? Those of us protesting here, at ALC, LCF, etc. are just the tip of the iceberg.

September 27, 2007 at 10:19 pm

Princess Dieter

It would be interesting to know when Kimmer-Heidi’s son turned legal age. Maybe THAT is what she was waiting for, since she put the site under his name. If the son turned 18 Spring of 2006, that would definitely put the motivation there…

(Can a 17 yeard old have a site registered under their name? I have no idea.)

And I totally believe she’d be going to LCF to gather her following before heading off.

The Princess

September 27, 2007 at 10:45 pm

antikimkins

Kimmer certainly doesn’t appear to be a millionaire, in fact, she still seems to have money problems. I wonder out of the thousands who joined after the WW article, how many requested refunds within that 24 hour block?

September 27, 2007 at 11:20 pm

Becky/Littlebit

Kimmer canceled the 24- hour refund policy prior to the magazine feature. She did give out some refunds from those who joined and cited kidney problems or other medical concerns, once they saw the diet, but very few.

I cannot prove those figures are accurate, but i would not be at all surprised if the membership numbers are not actually higher now.

I know how busy i was. I saw the posts rolling through there. At one time, I had access to member service emails, and she was getting literally thousands of emails a day. I was getting scores of PMs, as were many others. We had thousands online at a time, and hundreds posting intros and joining new challenges every day.

She also became suddenly very elated, and became much more willing to pay for help.

I imagine many signed up, looked at the diets, and left quickly, chalking it up to an expensive lesson learned. Most were not a typical online crowd. Quite a few lurked, but did not post. Many posted, but have dropped out now. Many have gotten banned, or cowed into silence. Still, they paid, and she kept the money.

She only took the membership and online numbers down when she began drawing too much fire from LCF, Slamboard, etc. I believe she wanted to reduce speculation into her gross profits once people started doing the math.

I have heard people say that they would look online and not see many people there back then. Perhaps they were not looking in the right places, because that was not at all the case then. The way the site was set up, the number reflected on a forum index page did not reflect the number actually viewing threads within that particular forum, but only the number of people looking at that index page at the time. You would have to open each thread to get a full count.

Only she knows for sure what her full intake was, but I have reason to believe it was quite high.

She told me she had only put back into the business what was absolutely necessary, and had the rest invested at a 10% rate of return. Who knows if that is true?

I do not believe she planned this out years in advance. I think she posted at LCF first for ego and power, and only later for money. I just don’t see her as someone who can sustain hard work for long without some kind of a payoff, but rather as an opportunist. I could be wrong. Time will tell.

September 28, 2007 at 2:04 am

Tam (Kimkins refugee)

Thank you, Becky, for that insight. I guess I’ve been hoping for lower numbers because that would mean fewer people were scammed, but it looks like she really was/is raking in the big bucks. Thanks again.

September 28, 2007 at 2:47 am

Dottie

Becky that’s very insightful. I also do not think that this giant “venture” was on her mind when she started out on LCF. Looking back on when she left, I really think she was planning on just getting $$ out of maybe a couple of dozen of her “fans” off LCF, then shutting the site down due to lack of funds (or hitting the members up for more $$ to “run” it).
I don’t really think she had any idea that it would take off in the big way that it did.

September 28, 2007 at 7:15 am

Princess Dieter

I totally believe there was a windfall from WW. That kind of coverage is sure to do that.

And I’m sure H/K knew to keep the money inflow quiet and the lifestyle discreet so as to keep all sorts off her back. Spending oodles would have drawn attention, I think. There is also the miser phenomenon where accumulating the money is the kick, not spending it. In fact, spending it reduces the pleasure of actually having a hoard.

Even if it’s half the reported 40K, that’s a lot of mookah going mostly to ONE woman who is hardly accountable. She got the Paypal and the checks. Why should she be truthful about how much when she’s not truthful about the rest?

And if she can offer Christian a car, then 100K for an Oprah brass ring, trust me, that means she had to have a nice, tidy reserve.

It would only have taken 10K members after WW to get 600K. And if that’s not reported or paid taxes on, that’s a nice chunk for any “disabled” person on government dole.

Didn’t someone say that the son bragged mom had a million in Paypal? (Can’t verify where that came from. Just remember reading it.)

The Princess

September 28, 2007 at 8:31 am

Sherrie

I think you’re right Becky.

September 30, 2007 at 8:12 pm

Peaches12

Why did all the admin. wait until the same time to quit. If you knew the diet was dangerous why did you continue to state otherwise, was it just the money that kept you going. I’m so confused, I continue to do Kimkins but with a higher fat intake since my body stalled and the increase intake helped it to lose quicker. How could so many been individual’s lifes have been put in jeopardy for merely a paycheck. Can you answer that, Becky?





Update on Christin

26 09 2007

This morning Christin had an appointment with a cardiologist. Becky just posted an update a Jimmy Moore’s forum that read,

WooHoo! Christin just called on her way home from the doctor, and she is doing well.
I was in tears at some of what she had to say.

She’ll have more to say and blog about, and I’ll leave that up to her.

But, it will have an impact on efforts to shut Kimkins down!

*****

Stay tuned, we’ll update when Christin posts about the cardiologist findings and if her recent health scare was related to the Kimkins diet.





Kimmer’s on a Roll

26 09 2007

In what is turning out to be a string of nastygrams, Kimmer recently sent Regandy (a former admin who organized the upcoming cruise) an email too.

Kimmer wrote:

After the PMs you send me which pretty much said the opposite of what you’re posting at Jimmy’s, I’m kind of scratching my head about it.

Regandy replied (publicly on her blog):

Kimmer I wanna be free

You sent me an email and commented: “After the PMs you send me which pretty much said the opposite of what you’re posting at Jimmy’s, I’m kind of scratching my head about it.”

Here is the reason that my early PM’s to don’t exactly match my posts on recent lowcarb threads. In the beginning I still believed it was a plot. In the beginning I just couldn’t believe that it could all be a lie. I still wanted to give you the benefit of the doubt.

As the days and weeks have passed, more pieces of the puzzle are put together and the picture is now clear. You didn’t tell the truth. AND you think that I didn’t tell you the truth? (concerning my PM’s and my posts matching)

YES, I admit, in the beginning my PM’s were still believing in you. As I saw more and more things exposed, I began to be careful about what I wrote… as you wrote in the email, ” There’s no need to “plan your exit carefully”, you could have left at any time. You explained to me your reason for leaving, although you don’t need a reason at all. Kimkins isn’t a prison.”

Since you had lied about the photos and the weight loss and the foster children, does that not EXPLAIN why I was “careful”? There were some very good friends at kimkins that I didn’t want to lose touch with. There were some people depending on me concerning the cruise. When I give my word I will do everything that I can to keep my word.

Of course my PM’s don’t match my posts…. I got wiser. I saw more proof from MORE than one source.

Which brings me to the last point. MONEY. You sent me $1,500 to pay for 4 admin tickets for the cruise. I sent you $1,000 of that back through paypal (and I have the receipt). I owe you $500. Here is the deal. NOT pretty, but honest. SINCE the payment wasn’t due until October, I used the money on purchases (cruise trinkets – $100) knowing that I would have the money when the next payment was due. I HAD NO IDEA that things would change so rapidly and that the money would become an issue. I have told you that I would send it back to you, and I will. I do not expect you to pay for anything connected to the cruise. In the email you mentioned that “Any monies we advanced to you for the Kimkins Cruise should be returned. Please send any receipts/paperwork to Heidi Diaz, 529 N. McKinley #104-309, Corona, CA 92879. Any unreturned cash advance must be reported as personal income per IRS regulations.” Please look for a paypal deposit by my next paycheck on the 1st.

I’m not hiding. I want my contacts to be public, that is why I am putting my reply here. I don’t want there to be ANY questions concerning my answers.

I want to be free.





Becky: “Heidi. The only one you are fooling anymore is yourself.”

26 09 2007

After reading the Wonderwoman rants, Becky had this to say,

This is classic Kimmer on a tear — same style, same language, same nasty digs, same obsessions.

Just for the record, there is no conspiracy among those who left, and I am not making money from my blog or free newsletter, nor do I intend at any point in the future to have my own diet or forum or anything even remotely resembling any of that.
I post on Jimmy’s forum, as a member. I have a blog, like many people do, with a few links that have paid me nothing.

I have a free newsletter, with menus and recipes, just to motivate me to stay the course, which I haven’t had time to send lately because
1) I have a real life, and
2) I devote too much of my online time to the demise of Kimkins.

Sorry, Heidi – I LOST money leaving you – remember? Those paranoid delusions are all in your head.

I told my DH about your latest rants, and he said, “Tranference, much?”

We’re all onto your and your tricks, Heidi. The only one you are fooling anymore is yourself.





Becky Says…

21 09 2007

Well, we’re not going to steal her thunder…

Go read her blog entry for today, it’s outstanding!